Drum Roll for Christmas Lights

“JOY TO THE WORLD–!” 

Everyone come outside! December 1st is National Christmas Lights Day, and the house inside and out is decorated and ready to celebrate.  

Decorating Christmas trees with lights began in Germany during the 16th century. Before electric lights, families placed candles on the tree branches—yikes! If not careful, that practice led to fires and not very happy Christmas memories. At least the cat didn’t do it. 

Electric Christmas lights were invented in the 1880s, but it took decades for the invention to catch on. Suddenly, families could enjoy the twinkling lights for weeks leading up to Christmas. Even then, it wasn’t unusual for children to be given the duty of checking the heat of the Christmas lights to make sure they weren’t about to burn up the presents. The long-lasting, cooler LED lights were a savior to fingers and Christmas trees everywhere. Now, there’s no excuse to wait to string up the beautiful lights.  

Put up the tree and pull out the decorations. Once you reach the lights, you will inevitably find them in a tangled pile no matter how carefully you put them away last year. Play some carols over your speakers and prepare a snack for the next hour of you sitting on the floor untangling the mass. Once you’re done, you’ll test the bulbs even though you don’t remember where you put the spare bulbs five years ago just to admire the twinkling lights. 

Southeast Dairy Association - mulled hot chocolate

To work out the soreness from your endeavors, walk through your neighborhood to enjoy the light displays with those you love. Prepare Mulled Hot Chocolate to take with you on your journey through the electric winter wonderland. Bring a radio app along so you can listen to any accompanying music your neighbors worked to sync to their month-long project in the yard. The string lights at home can act as a jolly floor decoration a little longer. You have to support your community first.