Tips for a Successful Friendsgiving

A mashup of “friends” and “Thanksgiving,” Friendsgiving is a less formal celebration than the family-driven Thanksgiving. A potluck of traditional holiday foods beside Laura’s amazing tacos and Johnny’s grilled pork chops provides the special flavors of the season and the comfort of spending the day with lifelong friends. While the day doesn’t need meticulous planning, everyone still needs to know the expectations for the day. Here are some tips for hosting a successful Friendsgiving feast. 

Southeast Dairy Association - cheese grit cakes
  • Assign tasks to friends to make the day more enjoyable for you. You are providing a home and WIFI for guests. You don’t have to provide the entire feast, too. Text a reminder about what dish they agreed to bring or who they need to pick up on the way. For friends on a tight budget, ask for help setting the table or putting the final touches on the meal. 
  • Speaking of the meal–it’s going to take time to prepare. Have snacks ready to go. You don’t want your friends hangry while you run around in the kitchen. Something sure to illicit comments of “Wow, fancy!” are Cheese Grit Cakes, but if you need to cut down on the day’s cooking, stock up on premade snacks. Guests will be just as happy munching on BBQ chips or a fruit platter as the smell of dinner wafts through the air. Don’t forget plates, utensils, and napkins, or else guests will brush crumbs onto your floor or use the back of their hands as a napkin. Gross. 
  • Make sure there are plenty of desserts on the menu. People have strong opinions on what the best desserts are, especially when at a party. Even if your Friendsgiving dinner is not a traditional Thanksgiving meal, include favorites like pumpkin pie
  • Give everyone a party favor as they leave. Instead of a scented candle or a monogrammed goblet, send guests home with their own container of Friendsgiving leftovers. Whatever name you call it, the day still includes a feast, so there will be plenty of food remaining.